Scythe is an Interesting Utopia/Dystopia

Neal Shusterman’s book Scythe paints an interesting contrast between life without death, and now. It is set in a “post mortal” world where there is no death, but in order to control population, people must kill. These people are scythes. They are chosen from the ranks of the best people in the world, the people who don’t want to be scythes. Continue reading Scythe is an Interesting Utopia/Dystopia

Axis and Allies 1940 Review

By Leo Katowitz, a Novice Axis and Allies Player

You sit in a chair, leaning over a game board the size of the world. You determine the strategy of your next turn. You look over at your opponent, he is attacking the heartland of your territory, the capital. He is shaking over the massive amounts of troops you have, ready to strike. You grin. They are going into a trap, perfect for the situation. By the end of the game, you have pushed them back to their capital. You stand victoriously over the battlefield, looking down upon your enemies. If you are a lover of board games, and intensity, then Axis and Allies is for you!   Continue reading Axis and Allies 1940 Review

Is America Too Tech-Obsessed?

America is home to some of the biggest consumers on the planet, so it makes sense that we would be obsessed with the latest technology.  The average American adult spends ten hours a day staring at a screen. The average teenager spends nine hours a day on a device. Computers are powerful, useful machines, so it kind of makes sense that we would use them that much.  It’s possible to do so much with these devices, so why don’t we use them for more?

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9:00 AM Wednesday Start

When the news that the Wednesday late start coming to an end filled the middle school, there was an uproar. One eighth-grader said “I am very upset that the late start is now gone. I used that time to catch up on sleep and or work on projects. That time helped me not only be more energized in school but also helped me get work done.” It was a day where school started at 9:00 a.m. leaving children an extra hour to sleep in. If the student could not stay home during this time, they were allowed to come to school and wait for school to start.  Continue reading 9:00 AM Wednesday Start

Mix-Up Mix Dance

The Middle School Mix dance course is designed to provide students with opportunities to explore different forms of dance through class research, discussion, and physical movement,” says Sloan Kearney, the instructor for the dance section of Middle School Mix. Middle School. This new offering in the GFS Middle School was meant to give students art education that most had not been receiving before, but is it working?

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Technology: Does Thin Still Matter?

What do you think about when you think of a nice and expensive laptop? A thin Mac book? A sleek LG gram? The world’s thinnest laptop? Or do you think about a heavy, thick, and pro-gaming laptop? If you think about this, how far are you willing to go? Are you willing to go so thin that you can’t do anything because your laptop is powerful?

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Are 3 Day Weekends in Our Future?

Three-day weekends are what many of middle schoolers wish for. Not having to go to work or school on Mondays would make the school days that much more enjoyable. Things used to be worse, in the 1920s many people only got a one-day weekend. Henry Ford gave his workers an extra day off so they would have more time to buy his cars and use them more. While this was not entirely good intentions, it gave people an extra day off to spend with their families. Many people theorized that the workweek would keep getting shorter, but why hasn’t it? Maybe it’s because people don’t want a 3 day weekend? Or maybe they need all 5 days to get things done? Continue reading Are 3 Day Weekends in Our Future?

ABC or 123: Arts vs. Sciences

Would you rather have a pencil in your hand or math problems in your brain?

Student and teachers at GFS answered the question, “Which one do you like more, Art and English or Math and Science?” Many people differ on their favorite subjects. It may be because of grades, workload, or what they enjoy the most. Continue reading ABC or 123: Arts vs. Sciences

Editorial on School Shootings: Are We Next?

In response to the 25 fatal elementary/high school shootings since the Columbine shooting on April 20, 1999, there was a national walk-out on April 20 in over 2000 schools around the U.S. (and some in the U.K.). Students participating in the walkout are pushing for stricter and firmer gun laws from Congress, in the hope that these laws will put an end to gun violence in general, not just in schools. Our own GFS middle school community participated by marching around Germantown with signs and writing letters to the local government.

While we haven’t experienced any mass school shootings in Philadelphia, should we be asking the question, “Are we next?” Continue reading Editorial on School Shootings: Are We Next?

Talking About Money with Strangers

There are lots of examples of disparity in the world, but the one that is most obvious to me is the stark contrast between the rich and the poor, especially near my school. Germantown Friends School is located in Germantown, where the average household makes less than the yearly tuition to go to GFS. I really started to understand this extreme separation one afternoon while I was waiting to get on the bus. I was at the bus stop blocks away from my school, when a group of three girls walked across the street. I was minding my own business when I heard the tallest one say, “Hey you! How are you doing?”

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Podcast: Friend Groups at GFS?

Are there friend groups at GFS? Reporters Jasper M. and Joshua M. reached out to the GFS community and asked questions like “do you think there are friend groups at GFS?” and “How many friend groups do you think there are?” We got many different answers. Hope you enjoy!

Privacy in the Information Age

Why should we trust our information with people who would give it away freely? That’s the question that many were forced to ask when it was revealed that Facebook sold people’s info to Cambridge Analytica, a British political consulting firm.  This data was used to help target people with ads during the presidential election. Facebook willingly gave people´s information away, knowing that they would be betraying their trust. Continue reading Privacy in the Information Age