Theft at GFS

CAFETERIA

While it can certainly be argued that some items in the cafeteria are overpriced, this cannot be used as an excuse for stealing.  Unfortunately, that is exactly what is happening. We interviewed many students and found several who said they had, in fact, actually witnessed people stealing. Witnesses said that some people have been seen stealing between cashier shifts or after sports, like flag football. After their sports, some students go down to the cafeteria for  water; others use it as an opportunity to steal.

You might wonder what foods people steal. Most witnesses say chips, ice cream, drinks and baked goods. Usually the thieves shove the food in their coats or hoodies, and take off. We talked to one suspected thief who denied all charges (He will go unnamed.) We talked to Terry, the manager of the cafeteria, and he said that on average about one thousand dollars ($1000) worth of food is stolen from the cafeteria each year. He said that it was “horrible.” So if you are thinking about stealing, stop and think about who you are really taking from, and what you’re losing in the process.

COMPUTERS

A total of 39 computers were stolen over Thanksgiving break from the Sustainable Urban Science Center Building at GFS. School officials claim that the break-in was between the hours of 2:30 pm on the 24th and 9:00 pm on the 25th.  The computers were new Macbook laptops that were in three different classrooms. The first two carts were on the first floor in two classrooms that were next to each other. The final room that was broken into was on the second floor; those computers were also in pad-locked carts. The building was locked from the inside, but the alarms were not on.  School officials think it may have been an inside job because the thief had to know that the alarm was off that day. The carts were opened with a bolt cutter. These were the only carts with new laptops in them. A total of 50,000 dollars in laptops was stolen, and since these were the only carts with new computers, it strengthens the suspicion that it was an inside job because the thief had to know which carts to target. When the police checked the area they found no useable fingerprints, and the thief was not caught on video because there are no cameras in the building.

Since this theft, security has installed small round black pads on many of the exterior doors. All of the security guards have been equipped with “wands” which they touch to the pads as they make their rounds. The wands identify what guard went in and when. Deb Mattefy, Director of Security and Operations, has stated that additional security patrols have been placed on campus. Hopefully, these measures will be effective in stopping any potential thieves.

 

By Alex Mirage and Ishmael Bynum