Editorial: Social Media & School

Social media is an excellent tool, you can reach millions of people all over the world with one click of a button. Millions can be called to action for a cause. But at what price does social media come? Stealing away precious moments from its user, it seems like the user of social media is not the owner of his/her social media page, but social media has become the owner of him/her. Social media allows for the mass distribution of cute puppy photos or perverted violations of privacy. Social media has connected people and enabled selfless acts of kindness, but it has also created a new front for bullying. Not only do we have a physical imprint, we have a virtual imprint. These new virtual imprints last forever, never fading, while our physical imprint has an expiration date.

When should the school take action against social media? Should the school take action when it is harming the child at home? Or should the school take action when social media starts to affect or become a part of school? The fact is, we are not always in school, and the rules we abide by in school are very different from the rules outside of school. A significant issue with the school monitoring social media is jurisdiction. If a school has the authority to follow our online activities, then where does it end? Can it also pass judgment on what we do physically? School rules usually only apply on campus, but social media creates the tremendous potential for massive fallout from just one post, and one post can change a long-lasting friendship. However, the same could be said for physical interaction. It seems irrational for the school to follow us during our downtime, or when we are off campus, unless it affects our life in school.

The school currently has no way to monitor social media, making way for hate to possibly spread. Though some monitoring is needed, it should only happen in times where social media affects friendships and schoolwork. If the school were to implement complete control over social media accounts, there would definitely be backlash from the GFS community, as well as the other cities in the area. That is why the school should only get involved in issues relating to social media if it affects the students while in school. Some ways the school can get involved include disciplinary actions, implementing rules related to social media, and in the worst cases possible, expulsion. Any practices the school could implement include stricter phone policies, discussions with teachers about social media, and how to handle it, even having a no social media policy, but that’s crossing the line of privacy.


The editorial board of The Corner thinks that social media should only be monitored when it directly affects school work, and the school has total justification for penalizing those who post absence or harmful content on their social media pages, given that it affects schoolwork. If there is a cyberbully, that problem should be dealt with immediately and swiftly. But if someone is posting rude commentary on someone that is not one of his/her peers, then the school should not have the power to intervene.

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