All posts by Asaf Lebovic

Hello! My name is Asaf, and I am the head editor of the GFS Corner. I immigrated to America when I was 6, and have always had a strong interest in journalism and politics. And shrubberies.

The Women’s March on Washington

On January 21st, millions of women marched around the world in opposition to the incoming Drumpf administration. The most anticipated march, taking place in Washington D.C., had over 470,000 people marching, around three times more than the estimated amount of people who attended Donald Drumpf’s inauguration.

Continue reading The Women’s March on Washington

Midterms by Ben Botvinick

–Below is an excerpt from Ben Botvinick’s bendeplume.com

We all have our ways of dealing with an upcoming test. Some people eat. A lot. I have a friend who goes through about five bags of barbecue potato chips by the time he’s finished studying for a quiz. Another guy I know listens to a lot of classical music. He says it’s calming or whatever, I’ve never seen the appeal. Anyway, these are sort of generic strategies, if ya ask me. I go for quite a different approach.

Imagine you have a test coming up, and it’s gonna test you on all of the stuff you’ve learned from September up until June. What do you do? Take a minute to think about it…now stop. Pick up your phone, and text all your friends, and then spend a bit of time on Facebook. And when you’re finished with that, go online, pick any movie star, and do a bit of research on their childhood. For example, Will Ferrell. Apparently, he was a quiet kid and he set some sort of football record for his high school.

Whoa. Now, you’re reading this on a blog, so you don’t know what’s surprising yet, but I just spent…wait for it…half an hour researching Will Ferrell as a kid. And did I forget about my midterms? Sure did. Here’s the thing about tests in middle school: ya don’t really have to study. Well, of course you do, if you’re your average middle schooler, picking your nose and throwing tin foil balls into the trash from across the room. But if you’re paying attention in class and not having a staring contest with a squirrel out the window, who’s also probably on his way to work at the acorn factory or something (have some goddamn respect for the guy. I mean, come on, being late isn’t gonna bring up his average acorns-per-hour count.) Anyway, if you’re not messin’ around with your buddy, there’s no reason to study. And yes, I wrote that sweet, sweet rhyme, and I’ll be here all night.

What happens is that if you’re like me, you become a pro. Every bit of information seeps into your brain, and you’re left a god among mere mortals. And then, in the end, none of those buggers end up studying anyway, so if it’s graded on a curve then you’re fine. The point is, after a five minute glance at my notes before the test, I usually do fine. I’ve never gotten a grade below 45%. Last week, I scored a flaming 73% on a science quiz. Yep, didn’t even look at my books. My parents let me eat ice cream for dinner to celebrate. I told you. I’m a pro.

Trump as President: Student Talks Politics with NYT Columnist Thomas Edsall

On November 8th, 2016,the citizens of the US went to the polls to cast their vote for the 45th president of the United States. Donald Trump was elected to the office of the President of the United States, even though he did not win the popular vote. The county is divided in its reaction to the results of the election. While some people find Trump’s victory a triumph and a promise for positive change, others are apprehensive about what his term may look like and what actual changes he will bring about.

A few weeks ago I interviewed Thomas Edsall, the New York Times Weekly Opinion Columnist, about what how a Trump presidency can affect us all. The interview took place before the election, but the quotes are still in context and reflect Mr. Edsall’s opinions on Donald Trump.
Continue reading Trump as President: Student Talks Politics with NYT Columnist Thomas Edsall

Affluenza

Affluenza, according to Google, is “a psychological malaise supposedly affecting wealthy young people, symptoms of which include a lack of motivation, feelings of guilt, and a sense of isolation”. The word “Affluenza” itself originates from the combination of the two words “influenza” and “affluent”, quite literally meaning “the wealthy flu”. Continue reading Affluenza

2015: The Warmest Year on Record

As 2015 ended, a new study was released showing that 2015 was way warmer than the average year.

NASA and the NOAA lately published a study that shows that 2015 was the warmest year on record. Lately each year has been getting warmer. The latest record was set in 2014 when temperatures climbed up to 0.74ºC hotter than the 1961-1990 average. The new record shows that the yearly average was around 0.87ºC warmer than the normal average. For more information, I interviewed Mark Croxford, one of the High School science teachers. Continue reading 2015: The Warmest Year on Record

The Recent Violence in Tel Aviv

It was January 1st. My sister, father and grandmother were all exchanging their farewells. Suddenly a few ambulances and a few police cars passed by. My family understood something was wrong. Later, they found out that a Palestinian terrorist shot 9 people, killing two of them just a mere block away. Continue reading The Recent Violence in Tel Aviv