Category Archives: Editorials

Editorial: Does social media make us more lonely?

The world has never before been more connected. We have global communication at our fingertips; we can contact someone on the other side of the Earth in a minute. But this also means that our generation is the first to get distracted by the very thing that enables us to work and study better.

Continue reading Editorial: Does social media make us more lonely?

Editorial: Is it Day 9 yet? The new schedule

Have you noticed people in the middle school walking around asking people what day it is? Or showing up in P.E. when they are supposed to be in math? Or feeling hangry before lunch–hungry enough to eat your own homework, because lunch is not until almost 1pm? Have you been baffled by the period switch? All of this is because GFS transitioned this year to an eight-day rotating schedule.

Last year, we had a two-week schedule, which was confusing at first, but we quickly got used to it. The change to a new eight-day schedule occurred to help with people missing the same class from early sports dismissals or missing Mondays and Fridays because of holidays and days off school. However, this problem has not been solved, instead classes before expo have taken the hit, as have our electives for clubs.

The eight-day schedule has been difficult for students to adjust to. There seems to be an awkward division of time, between period switches, community block, and lunch time. We have trouble figuring out which course meets when. The school provided an app for student schedules, but middle schoolers aren’t allowed to look at their phones to check it. Instead, we have screens on campus reminding us which “day” it is, which seem needless if the schedule was rational. In addition, what’s wrong with a normal, five-day week? It would align with the outside world and be easier for us to remember.

One of the biggest difficulties for middle school is the 12:55 P.M. lunch. Last year, the school day was split up nicely, with two periods before snack, two periods before lunch, and two periods before Flex. The mornings last too long, with a total of five periods, or four hours and 35 minutes of class(including community block), occurring before lunch. The lunch period was also shortened by five minutes, which is significant since there’s already a rush in the lunchroom.

Previously, snack was more of a recess period for talking to your friends and doing whatever you want to be doing. This year, snack is much more important than it should be. Lunch is very late, so we need snack to sustain our energy throughout the day. We are growing kids, and we get hungry (and acne). It’s hard to focus on whatever x is equal to when you’re counting minutes until lunch starts. However, someone has to come last for lunch, and it would make more sense for high schoolers, who have free periods where they can snack, to take this burden.  Since not everyone brings snack in, we are provided a free snack by GFS, but what our bodies really need is food, Not salty cheez-its, stale pretzels, and neon orange goldfish.

The new schedule has many of the same flaws (if not more) as the five-day schedule. It needs to make more sense, and give more time for lunch. In the past, students expressed dislike for the A/B-week schedule, but we would prefer it to the eight-day schedule. Perhaps next year if or when the schedule is changed, we may long for the eight-day schedule.

Editorial on School Shootings: Are We Next?

In response to the 25 fatal elementary/high school shootings since the Columbine shooting on April 20, 1999, there was a national walk-out on April 20 in over 2000 schools around the U.S. (and some in the U.K.). Students participating in the walkout are pushing for stricter and firmer gun laws from Congress, in the hope that these laws will put an end to gun violence in general, not just in schools. Our own GFS middle school community participated by marching around Germantown with signs and writing letters to the local government.

While we haven’t experienced any mass school shootings in Philadelphia, should we be asking the question, “Are we next?” Continue reading Editorial on School Shootings: Are We Next?

Editorial: Are Adults Censoring the Wrong Things?

Have you gotten “the stork” as an answer when asking your parents the question, “Where do babies come from?” Ever since you were born, your parents have felt the need to censor as much of your life as possible. Don’t bother denying that your parents have tried to keep something away from you out of fear of you becoming a delinquent. While parents will stop at nothing to censor sex and profanity, let’s ask the question: are parents censoring the right things? Continue reading Editorial: Are Adults Censoring the Wrong Things?

Editorial: Does Middle School Matter in Life?

Being a student in middle school, it can be difficult to grasp the fact that high school seems right around the corner. Many middle schoolers ask, “does what we do in middle school affect our high school and college experience?”—and in the bigger picture, our life?

Continue reading Editorial: Does Middle School Matter in Life?