Tag Archives: Quaker

Is Meeting for Worship Important?

THIS ARTICLE IS NOT MEANT IN ANY WAY TO OFFEND OR DEMEAN RELIGIOUS WORSHIP.

Meeting for Worship is that half hour on Tuesdays spent in silent reflection, when students can reflect. It embodies the Quaker spirit, and is one of the few times when students and teachers can share their thoughts with the whole middle school. However, generally it seems nobody has thoughts to share. The only people who stand and share are the teachers or students who have announcements about clubs or sports. Should Meeting for Worship still be a part of our curriculum?

 

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Does GFS Embody the Quaker Spirit?

Most of you are probably nodding your heads, and saying, “Of course it does.” Because sure, we learn about quakerism, have meeting for worship, and partake in numerous moments of silence, but does that really make us a perfect Quaker school? Some people think that students’ words and actions make us un-quakerly, but others strongly disagree.

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Editorial: The GFS Bubble

On the other side of Germantown Avenue, just thirty feet from the end of Germantown Friend School’s campus, lies NHS Parkside Recovery, a methadone clinic.  Even if they have noticed, not many students think about it.

As a rule, GFS is very liberal. The student body is fairly affluent. Almost every family owns one, if not two cars and most live in relatively good-sized houses.  Full tuition for the Middle School costs $28,000 to $30,000 per year.  The neighborhood of Germantown, on the other hand, has somewhat less.  Average household income* is around $37,000, just 23% more than GFS tuition and only 13.1% of the population attends one or more years of college (100% of GFS graduates attend 4-year colleges).  With all this, it’s no wonder the idea of a GFS Bubble is so often brought up. Continue reading Editorial: The GFS Bubble

YouTube Red: Washing Away Equality?

Since YouTube was released in 2005, one simple thing has made it different from other social media sites. On other sites there could be some kind of upgrade, or class (you would have to pay for), that made the split between the people who could afford, and those who couldn’t. An example of this is on Instagram. You can pay to get old, unused accounts, to follow yours, using an app that you have to pay for. It’s sort of like a bribe.  YouTube was never like this, until now.

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