Tag Archives: school

Editorial: Social Media & School

Social media is an excellent tool, you can reach millions of people all over the world with one click of a button. Millions can be called to action for a cause. But at what price does social media come? Stealing away precious moments from its user, it seems like the user of social media is not the owner of his/her social media page, but social media has become the owner of him/her. Social media allows for the mass distribution of cute puppy photos or perverted violations of privacy. Social media has connected people and enabled selfless acts of kindness, but it has also created a new front for bullying. Not only do we have a physical imprint, we have a virtual imprint. These new virtual imprints last forever, never fading, while our physical imprint has an expiration date.

When should the school take action against social media? Should the school take action when it is harming the child at home? Or should the school take action when social media starts to affect or become a part of school? The fact is, we are not always in school, and the rules we abide by in school are very different from the rules outside of school. A significant issue with the school monitoring social media is jurisdiction. If a school has the authority to follow our online activities, then where does it end? Can it also pass judgment on what we do physically? School rules usually only apply on campus, but social media creates the tremendous potential for massive fallout from just one post, and one post can change a long-lasting friendship. However, the same could be said for physical interaction. It seems irrational for the school to follow us during our downtime, or when we are off campus, unless it affects our life in school.

The school currently has no way to monitor social media, making way for hate to possibly spread. Though some monitoring is needed, it should only happen in times where social media affects friendships and schoolwork. If the school were to implement complete control over social media accounts, there would definitely be backlash from the GFS community, as well as the other cities in the area. That is why the school should only get involved in issues relating to social media if it affects the students while in school. Some ways the school can get involved include disciplinary actions, implementing rules related to social media, and in the worst cases possible, expulsion. Any practices the school could implement include stricter phone policies, discussions with teachers about social media, and how to handle it, even having a no social media policy, but that’s crossing the line of privacy.


The editorial board of The Corner thinks that social media should only be monitored when it directly affects school work, and the school has total justification for penalizing those who post absence or harmful content on their social media pages, given that it affects schoolwork. If there is a cyberbully, that problem should be dealt with immediately and swiftly. But if someone is posting rude commentary on someone that is not one of his/her peers, then the school should not have the power to intervene.

Editorial: What is GFS missing?

We often think of GFS as having it all. Good teachers, historic buildings, fields, and good values. But what aren’t we getting? What does GFS need, and what standards should we be meeting that we aren’t already? Should we be satisfied with the current state of GFS? There are many things that GFS needs to improve upon in a variety of areas.

Our Campus is beautiful, but some of the facilities have not been improved upon for a long time. Many of the buildings have been around since the turn of the twentieth century, and have not been renovated in decades. There are some obvious things needed, such as air conditioning in the Cary Building, but there are other things that GFS, with all of its resources could do. Though we have the extremely energy efficient Wade Building, sadly we do not have any solar panels on campus. This could be an easy way for GFS to save money, and be more environmentally friendly.

Our athletic programs are excellent, but there is a glaring lack in two areas. Most schools have an indoor swimming pool, but GFS doesn’t have one, despite giving exemptions to students who swim. The pool could be a multipurpose facility, with anything from lifeguard training to kayaking happening there. We would be able to have a GFS swimming team as well. GFS is not only missing a swimming pool, but it also does not have any school squash courts. The lack of squash courts leads to an overly competitive atmosphere in the middle school teams, which can lead to people becoming discouraged from the sport. 

Continue reading Editorial: What is GFS missing?

Are 3 Day Weekends in Our Future?

Three-day weekends are what many of middle schoolers wish for. Not having to go to work or school on Mondays would make the school days that much more enjoyable. Things used to be worse, in the 1920s many people only got a one-day weekend. Henry Ford gave his workers an extra day off so they would have more time to buy his cars and use them more. While this was not entirely good intentions, it gave people an extra day off to spend with their families. Many people theorized that the workweek would keep getting shorter, but why hasn’t it? Maybe it’s because people don’t want a 3 day weekend? Or maybe they need all 5 days to get things done? Continue reading Are 3 Day Weekends in Our Future?

School All Year Long

There are some days when the only thing that crosses your mind is summer. The teacher is talking about a new subject and you’re tapping your pencil mindlessly. The thought of swimming with your friends, playing baseball outside or reading a book in a hammock is all you can think of. No matter what time of year it is, this feeling comes to every middle student across the United States, but more and more schools are having year-round school.

Continue reading School All Year Long

The Art of Doodling

By Peter Ilyin

It’s math class and the room is boiling hot. All of the students are struggling to pay attention to the droning teacher, all but one. This student is absentmindedly drawing while the teacher is droning. The teacher notices and stalks the student, moves in for the pounce, and crack, he slams the ruler on the doodle page. He shouts about next week being a test and no one paying attention. Continue reading The Art of Doodling

8th Grade-itis

Starting in late April and early June, the students of GFS often see seniors lounging around. There is senior day, where the senior girls walk around in bikinis and the boys walk around in swim trunks. They have slip and slides and sometimes attempt to play beach volleyball (even though there is no beach). Around June, the 8th graders experience similar feelings to what the seniors are going through. 8th grade-itis.

Continue reading 8th Grade-itis

Teenager Dies from Excessive Caffeine

On April 26, 2017, Davis Allen Crepe collapsed from consuming a Diet Mountain Dew, a latte, and an energy drink all in a time span of 2 hours.  All of this caffeine, combined induced arrhythmia (improper beating of the heart) led to him suffering a cardiac arrest (unexpected loss of heart function, breathing, and consciousness.)

Is caffeine consumption a problem at GFS?

Continue reading Teenager Dies from Excessive Caffeine

6th Grade: The Bottom of the Food Chain

The 6th graders, the nasty little pests, the little annoying brats, they are the bottom. The scum at the bottom of the Middle School Melting Pot. Whatever you call them, they are universally hated by all but their very own. But why? Why are 6th grades hated so much? Their height? Their pubescent voices? Just what is it that makes them so annoying? And should older students respect, instead of bully, the little twerps?

Continue reading 6th Grade: The Bottom of the Food Chain

Is Meeting for Worship Important?

THIS ARTICLE IS NOT MEANT IN ANY WAY TO OFFEND OR DEMEAN RELIGIOUS WORSHIP.

Meeting for Worship is that half hour on Tuesdays spent in silent reflection, when students can reflect. It embodies the Quaker spirit, and is one of the few times when students and teachers can share their thoughts with the whole middle school. However, generally it seems nobody has thoughts to share. The only people who stand and share are the teachers or students who have announcements about clubs or sports. Should Meeting for Worship still be a part of our curriculum?

 

Continue reading Is Meeting for Worship Important?